On overworking

D’ya know what I’m getting tired of everywhere I go?

The low-key humblebrag about how hard people are working, how many projects they’ve had on and then the polar opposite of people writing posts that declare that ‘guys, I need to take time for myself. This year has been hectic- my brain demands that I switch-off.”

Because all this kind of chat is glorifying a culture of overworking and pushing yourself to breaking point in your career- as a good thing.

When in my book- working yourself to the point of anxiety, stress and exhaustion is something we should discourage.

Screen Shot 2017-12-13 at 13.57.16.pngIt’s something that is even commonplace in my office. People who slyly drop into conversations that they were in the office until closing last night. People who’ve been up until 11 at night doing client work- and people on social media declaring that they’re working themselves to the bone.

Now don’t get me wrong- I admire people with a strong work ethic. I genuinely believe that many people need a job in order to feel a sense of purpose and motivation- but lord almighty- enough is enough.

I don’t want to feel guilty when I want to leave work on time. I don’t want to feel like I have to kill myself with stress and exhaustion to be admired or thought of as a productive employee.

I don’t like that the culture of productivity demands late nights and multiple cups of coffee.

I felt much the same as this at university. I’m an organised person, I’m good with time management and I preferred to work from home. But I often felt guilty as I saw people pulling all nighters and working in the library for 12 hours a day.

But why is it like this? If I can get the same amount of productive work done as them- why do I need to showcase that I’m doing it in a way that’s less damaging to my health and well-being?

I want productivity and hard-work to embrace people who care about what they do, not how many hours they’re doing it in.

Rach

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